Church of San Pablo-Cordoba

The style of the church is Romanesque-Gothic Cistercian, built on Roman buildings and Almohads, and was built during the last third of the thirteenth century and the first of the fourteenth century. In the XV some works were made and in the 18th it was reformed to Baroque taste. The church has a cover on Capitulares street, baroque, made in marble in 1708, through which you can access a small compass on the front of which is the church itself, whose main facade has a 16th-century Mannerist style façade . The interior consists of three naves divided by pillars that are covered with Mudejar latticed coffered ceilings. The head is formed by three apses, the circular sides in the interior and rectangular in the exterior, with a quarter-sphere vault, and the central one with a pentagonal plan and a ribbed vault. Interior view of the central nave, with the Altar greater in the background. In the nave of the Gospel there is an access door with a pointed arch, with caliphal capitals added in the last intervention, which communicates with San Pablo Street. In the nave of the Epistle, an old door of Gothic-Mudejar style today serves as the cover of a chapel. Between the conserved chapels it emphasizes the one of the Chapel of the Virgin of the Rosary, constructed in Century XV and reformed in 1758, an excellent example of the baroque Cordovan. The tower rises at the foot of the church, being its first stone body and on this stands a wooden structure that serves as a bell tower. In this church you can admire one of the most important sculptures of the Holy Week in Cordoba: Our Lady of Sorrows, made by Juan de Mesa in 1627, holder of the brotherhood of Las Angustias, whose canonical headquarters is temporarily in this church. San Pablo is also the headquarters of the Brotherhood of the Expiration. After the conquest of the city, Fernando III donated to the Dominicans the land in the area of ​​Ajerquía, ratifying the concession in 1241 by means of a privilege in which he stated: “I give you and I grant that place in Cordoba, with its belongings where the monastery is with all that the friars had as my donation and with a third of the water that runs at the foot of the wall and near the barbican between the fence and the almedina … ” It was such an extension of the land that the Dominicans could build a large building and endow it with an orchard known as Almesa, for whose irrigation the water granted by the king was used. The first buildings were dedicated to housing and then the church whose work culminated in the fifteenth century was erected. Later, new constructions were added and the previous ones were reformed. During the French domination, in 1810, the convent was converted into a barracks and only the church maintained its original function. In 1848, before the ruinous state of the convent, its demolition was ordered, leaving only the references of nineteenth-century writers. The church and annexed dependencies were preserved and at the beginning of the 20th century, Castiñeira, Inurria and P.Pueyo, carried out a great restoration, eliminating the Baroque decoration of the 17th century. In 1904 the Claretian Fathers took charge of the temple, which to this day functions as a parish of regular worship. The style of the church is Romanesque-Gothic Cistercian, built on Roman buildings and Almohads, and was built during the last third of the thirteenth century and the first of the fourteenth century. In the XV some works were made and in the 18th it was reformed to Baroque taste. The church has a cover on Capitulares street, baroque, made in marble in 1708, through which you can access a small compass on the front of which is the church itself, whose main facade has a 16th-century Mannerist style façade . The interior consists of three naves divided by pillars that are covered with Mudejar latticed coffered ceilings. The head is formed by three apses, the circular sides in the interior and rectangular in the exterior, with a quarter-sphere vault, and the central one with a pentagonal plan and a ribbed vault. Interior view of the central nave, with the Altar greater in the background. In the nave of the Gospel there is an access door with a pointed arch, with caliphal capitals added in the last intervention, which communicates with San Pablo Street. In the nave of the Epistle, an old door of Gothic-Mudejar style today serves as the cover of a chapel. Between the conserved chapels it emphasizes the one of the Chapel of the Virgin of the Rosary, constructed in Century XV and reformed in 1758, an excellent example of the baroque Cordovan. The tower rises at the foot of the church, being its first stone body and on this stands a wooden structure that serves as a bell tower. In this church you can admire one of the most important sculptures of the Holy Week in Cordoba: Our Lady of Sorrows, made by Juan de Mesa in 1627, holder of the brotherhood of Las Angustias, whose canonical headquarters is temporarily in this church. San Pablo is also the headquarters of the Brotherhood of La Expiración.El Convent of San Pablo was founded along with four others at the first moment of the conquest of Córdoba and was placed under the invocation of San Pablo for being the saint of the day in which He conquered the city. The Dominicans obtained permission to found in 1236, which was confirmed in a royal document dated 1241, where the land was donated. This convent will always have the royal privilege and became one of the most important of the Order of Santo Domingo de Guzmán. Today the remains of the cloister of that convent can be seen integrated into the passage that gives access to the Ministry of Culture, also in Capitulares street. The chapter house, the work of Hernán Ruiz II, was left unfinished, possibly due to lack of funds, in the Jardines de Orive, it is located in the grounds of the old convent garden. Throughout 2008, the restoration and remodeling of the building was carried out in order to allocate it to the cultural space of the city. The style of the church is Cistercian Romanesque-Gothic, built on Roman buildings and Almohads, and was built during the last third of the thirteenth century and the first of the fourteenth century. In the XV some works were made and in the 18th it was reformed to Baroque taste. The church has a cover on Capitulares street, baroque, made in marble in 1708, through which you can access a small compass on the front of which is the church itself, whose main facade has a 16th-century Mannerist style façade . The interior consists of three naves divided by pillars that are covered with Mudejar latticed coffered ceilings. The head is formed by three apses, the circular sides in the interior and rectangular in the exterior, with a quarter-sphere vault, and the central one with a pentagonal plan and a ribbed vault. Interior view of the central nave, with the Altar greater in the background. In the nave of the Gospel there is an access door with a pointed arch, with caliphal capitals added in the last intervention, which communicates with San Pablo Street. In the nave of the Epistle, an old door of Gothic-Mudejar style today serves as the cover of a chapel. Between the conserved chapels it emphasizes the one of the Chapel of the Virgin of the Rosary, constructed in Century XV and reformed in 1758, an excellent example of the baroque Cordovan. The tower rises at the foot of the church, being its first stone body and on this stands a wooden structure that serves as a bell tower. In this church you can admire one of the most important sculptures of the Holy Week in Cordoba: Our Lady of Sorrows, made by Juan de Mesa in 1627, holder of the brotherhood of Las Angustias, whose canonical headquarters is temporarily in this church. San Pablo is also the headquarters of the Brotherhood of the Expiration. After the conquest of the city, Fernando III donated to the Dominicans the land in the area of ​​Ajerquía, ratifying the concession in 1241 by means of a privilege in which he stated: “I give you and I grant that place in Cordoba, with its belongings where the monastery is with all that the friars had as my donation and with a third of the water that runs at the foot of the wall and near the barbican between the fence and the almedina … ” It was such an extension of the land that the Dominicans could build a large building and endow it with an orchard known as Almesa, for whose irrigation the water granted by the king was used. The first buildings were dedicated to housing and then the church whose work culminated in the fifteenth century was erected. Later, new constructions were added and the previous ones were reformed. During the French domination, in 1810, the convent was converted into a barracks and only the church maintained its original function. In 1848, before the ruinous state of the convent, its demolition was ordered, leaving only the references of nineteenth-century writers. The church and annexed dependencies were preserved and at the beginning of the 20th century, Castiñeira, Inurria and P.Pueyo, carried out a great restoration, eliminating the Baroque decoration of the 17th century. In 1904 the Claretian Fathers took charge of the temple, which to this day functions as a parish of regular worship. The style of the church is Romanesque-Gothic Cistercian, built on Roman buildings and Almohads, and was built during the last third of the thirteenth century and the first of the fourteenth century. In the XV some works were made and in the 18th it was reformed to Baroque taste. The church has a cover on Capitulares street, baroque, made in marble in 1708, through which you can access a small compass on the front of which is the church itself, whose main facade has a 16th-century Mannerist style façade . The interior consists of three naves divided by pillars that are covered with Mudejar latticed coffered ceilings. The head is formed by three apses, the circular sides in the interior and rectangular in the exterior, with a quarter-sphere vault, and the central one with a pentagonal plan and a ribbed vault. Interior view of the central nave, with the Altar greater in the background. In the nave of the Gospel there is an access door with a pointed arch, with caliphal capitals added in the last intervention, which communicates with San Pablo Street. In the nave of the Epistle, an old door of Gothic-Mudejar style today serves as the cover of a chapel. Between the conserved chapels it emphasizes the one of the Chapel of the Virgin of the Rosary, constructed in Century XV and reformed in 1758, an excellent example of the baroque Cordovan. The tower rises at the foot of the church, being its first stone body and on this stands a wooden structure that serves as a bell tower. In this church you can admire one of the most important sculptures of the Holy Week in Cordoba: Our Lady of Sorrows, made by Juan de Mesa in 1627, holder of the brotherhood of Las Angustias, whose canonical headquarters is temporarily in this church. San Pablo is also the headquarters of the Brotherhood of Expiration.